Jun 27 2013

Preparing For Batik Watercolor Quilting Class

InternKelsi
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Preparing for the Batik Watercolor Quilting classes that the Pixeladies teach is not an easy task. There are many things that need to get done, and they are all very time consuming.

The first thing I did was sort the fabric squares that had been mixed up from being used in the previous class. There were over 1,500 2 1/2″ X 2 1/2″ fabric squares. A lot of the squares look similar so you have to be careful not to put them in the wrong pile.

KelsiSortingWeb

The second thing I did was sort through the pieces of fabric to see which squares Deb and Kris were running low on.

KelsiFabricWeb

The third thing I did was iron the fabric that needed to be cut.

KelsiIroningWeb

The fourth thing I needed to do was iron the fusing onto the fabric.

KelsiCuttingFusing

KelsiFusingFabric

The fifth thing I need to do – but I have not gotten to yet – is cut the fused fabric into 2 1/2″ squares. I know that will be easy because after having to cut the 2 1/2″ squares into 1 1/4″ squares for a special class, it can’t be worse than that. Out of everything I have had to do, this was probably what sucked* the most, because I needed to be so careful, and it took so long.

KelsiCuttingWeb

I enjoyed getting to work with the fabric, but hopefully I will never ever have to cut a 1 1/4″ square again.

* Kris and Deb said it was okay because this is more of a conversational blog for me to use the word “sucked” when normally in a business setting I would not.

 

 


Jun 25 2013

Tech Tuesday: How To Resize Images In Photoshop

InternKelsi
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I have learned a lot of new skills during the first week of my internship. One thing that I learned was that when you are uploading photos to the internet, you can resize them so they open quickly. I had used Photoshop before but never to resize photos for the internet. Here are the steps:

1) Open the image you want to work on in Photoshop.

2) Crop or manipulate your image as desired. Save this image.

3) From the Menu bar, click File > Save for Web and Devices (your version of PS may just say Save for Web).

4) Change the longest side of your photo to 800 pixels. (You can resize it smaller than 800 pixels, but the Pixeladies like to use 800). The image size is located near the bottom right corner of the Save for Web and Devices dialog box. After you set it to the size you want it press Enter.

NewImageSizeWeb

5) Choose the file format. I save my images as a .jpg.

NewImageFormatWeb

 

6) Click Save and upload your photo wherever you need it!


Jun 20 2013

We Have A New Intern!

Pixelkris
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We are so excited! For the first time in Pixeladies history, the studio is hosting an intern! Meet Kelsi, who started on Monday and will continue with us fulltime until July 5, 2013. We had so much work to do in the studio, we didn’t know where to start, so we decided to clean a bit. That meant putting away all of our quilts, which led us to find the label we had never attached to one of our quilts. So the first thing Kelsi learned was how to hand sew!

KelsiLabelCropWeb

 

We’re only on Day 4, but Kelsi has been learning a lot and making our lives much happier! We are getting some quality design time in because Kelsi is doing a lot of our office work for us. In fact, I am teaching her how to blog on WordPress right now! You can expect to read about Kelsi’s experience as our intern in the days to come as she will be blogging for us! Welcome, Kelsi!


Jun 18 2013

Tech Tuesday: Threading Motion Project – Quilt Vignettes

deb-of-pixeladies
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Sometimes it isn’t the technology that’s new, it’s what a person does with it.  I must admit, I’m not usually a big fan of video art installations, but Merli V. Guerra’s video at the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles had me riveted.

To create Threading Motion Project: Quilt Vignettes, Guerra chose six quilts from the New England Quilt Museum’s exhibition Silk! and projected each one onto a dancer or troupe of dancers.  What’s so exciting about seeing a quilt projected onto a dancer?  The shadows, the movement, the form.  I especially enjoyed three of the videos.

Sonya Lee Barrington’s quilt Spinal, a stylized backbone made of silk dupioni projected onto one solitary “dancer.”  There’s not much movement, but it is mesmerizing.

Spinal

Spinal
Video Still (left) and Actual Quilt (right)
Quilt by Sonya Lee Barrington

Judith Content’s Chasm, again projected onto a solitary dancer, was magical. This time the movement and changing camera angles created waves of color.

Chasm

Chasm
Quilt by Judith Content

Bethanne Nemesh’s  Gllding the Arbor was the most energetic dance.  The music and the energy of the dancers blended perfectly with the color scheme of the quilt.  What was so compelling about this piece was that the quilt was not reflected off of the black clothing of the dancers, as opposed to Chasm, where the quilt reflected off all of the dancer’s garb.

Guilding the Arbor

Guilding the Arbor
Quilt by Bethanne Nemesh

This installation is part of the exhibition, Milestones: Textiles of Transition showing at the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles May 8 – July 21, 2013.  To see the promo for the video, click here.

 

 


Jun 14 2013

Batik Watercolor Class At Blue Line Arts

Pixelkris
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We’ll be teaching a mini-version of our batik watercolor quilt class at Blue Line Arts in Roseville, CA on Saturday, June 22, 2013. You can sign up here: http://www.rosevillearts.org/events/adultworkshopseries.html. What’s different about this class, you might ask? To begin with, no sewing required! Painters, sculptors, politicians, and athletes alike can try their hand at this. Second, the squares are 1.25″ – one quarter the standard size. That means you will be making a smaller piece, but you will finish in a day. You will be able to frame it like this:

BatikWatercolor4BlueLine

That means you will have a piece of artwork to call your own in just one day! What’s not different about this class, you’ll also probably ask? You’ll still learn how to create movement with color and have lots of fun while we’re doing it!